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Posts from 2018-10-01

Saving the State Fish of Texas!

Another case for Recovering America's Wildlife Act...

Guadalupe Bass Restoration Helps Hill Country Rivers, Fishing and Paddling

After decades of conservation work to save the Guadalupe bass, the official state fish has been largely restored to at least one Texas river, the South Llano. Similar work continues on the Blanco and Pedernales and is about to start on the San Gabriel. The native fish is among more than 1,300 species of concern in Texas that would get help if the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act passes, with big benefits for rivers and water quality, people, and the economy.

Guadalupe bass conservation is about more than just one species of fish. It’s about helping the entire river where the fish lives, the people who live along its banks, and all those who love to come swim, wade, fish, float or paddle. On the South Llano, the Guadalupe bass is the centerpiece of a broader effort involving local communities, riverside landowners, nonprofits and universities, all focused on improving the health of the entire watershed.

And it’s been a way to get more people out enjoying rivers and the outdoors.

Since 1992, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has been stocking Guadalupe bass in Hill Country rivers, trying to restore a balance that was upset when the native fish started interbreeding with imported smallmouth bass stocked in the late 1950s.

In partnership with the Llano River Watershed Alliance, the Texas Tech University Llano River Field Station, area landowners and others, a plan was hatched to restore Guadalupe bass and improve the river’s ecological health. From 2011 to 2017, more than 700,000 genetically-pure Guadalupes were stocked into the South Llano. Today, less than 2 percent of the population now consists of hybrids.

Besides stocking, project partners organized river conservation workshops that engaged 750 landowners and community partners. More than 78,000 acres of ranchlands began stewardship practices to help preserve fish habitats. Restoration projects restored 7,754 acres of spring, stream and riparian habitats, directly benefiting water quality, as well as helping Guadalupe bass and many other aquatic creatures.

River recreation got a big boost as part of the mix. In 2012, TPWD and local community partners launched the South Llano River Paddling Trail, one of dozens of similar paddling trails on rivers, lakes and bays across Texas. Along 6.3 river miles, the trail gives kayakers and canoers safe places to put in and take out of the river, with signs and educational kiosks telling visitors about the Guadalupe bass.

“Our goal is to restore and maintain at least 10 self-sustaining populations of Guadalupe bass throughout its native creeks and rivers,” said Tim Birdsong, Chief of Habitat Conservation for the TPWD Inland Fisheries Division.

“If the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act passes, successful models like the restoration of Guadalupe Bass would spread to many other Texas rivers,” Birdsong added. “And since a portion of RAWA funds can be spent for education and outreach, that opens the way for more paddling trails and other programs to help people enjoy healthy rivers. It would be a huge win-win for watersheds, aquatic species and for everyone in Texas.”

Check out this Texas Parks and Wildlife video on Guadalupe Bass conservation!

 

Photos:

South Llano River near Junction, TPWD

Guadalupe Bass, TPWD

 

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